Tag Archives: printmaking

Emma McLellan

Emma McLellan – Artificially Translated

Emma McLellan

May 6 – June 5
Gallery open 7 days 10am – 5pm

For a long time, my work has explored genetic engineering through a blending of science fiction and reality; combining and juxtaposing literary fantasies with scientific possibilities.

Searching the internet, images of cloned animals and human medical stem cell research sit alongside photo shopped imaginings of hybridised dysfunctional animals. This melting pot of truth and lies reminds me of medieval printed bestiaries of imagined and real animals presented for examination and fascination.

This body of work explores an imagined representation of human organ cultivation and stem cell experiments.

All works are screen-printed and painted on panels, 2016.

Emma McLellan – 2016 

4th International Open Submission Printmaking Exhibition PART TWO

4th International Open Submission Printmaking Exhibition


Richard Hricko



Part two of the 4th International Open Submission Printmaking Exhibition features Margaret Ashman, Tom Baggaley, Richard Hricko, Carolyn McKenzie Craig, Miwako Nishizawa, Sumi Perera, Joseph Ryan, Mustafa Sidki and Ella Weber.

carolyn meckenzie craig

A finalists shortlist will be drawn up and our international judging panel will decide the overall winner of this year’s show.
The judges are:

Anthony Holmquist (USA) – first prize winner of Art at Wharepuke’s 3rd international open submission printmaking competition. Tony is an assistant professor in the Department of Art & Design at Fort Lewis College Durango, Colorado, USA, he visited Wharepuke as an artist in residence in May 2015 during his prize winning solo show Recurring Systems

Chris Pig (UK) – Award winning artist Chris Pig specialises in relief prints.  He is a member of the UK Society of Wood Engravers and was joint winner, with Hilary Paynter, of the Society’s 2009 competition.

Elizabeth Dove (USA) – Professor in the School of Art at the University of Montana.

Susanna Castleden (Australia) – Senior Lecturer and Director International in the School of Design and Art at Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.



The winning artist will have a solo show at Wharepuke.

4th Wharepuke International Open Printmaking Show

4th Wharepuke International Open Printmaking Show


Part One
Jan 14 – Feb 7

Gallery open 10am – 5pm every day


The 4th Wharepuke Open Printmaking show features 25 artists from 12 different countries selected from open submission.

The exhibition is divided into two parts.

Part One runs from Jan 14 to Feb 7 and features work by:

Eman Al Hashemi (UAE)
Ximena Bórquez (Chile)
Neala Glass (NZ)
Melissa Harshman (USA)
Sallyann Hingston (NZ)
Amanda Kralovic (USA)
Jakob Lee (USA)
Steve Lovett (NZ)
LUCE (Belgium)
Julia Ludwig (Germany)
Judy Major-Girardin (Canada)
Mia O (Japan)
Kavita Nayar (India)
Hamish Oakley-Browne (NZ)
Ruth Simons (UK)
Sandra Williams (Australia)


Part Two will take place from Feb 11 to March 6 and will feature

Margaret Ashman (UK)
Tom Baggaley (UAE)
Richard Hricko (USA)
Carolyn Mckenzie Craig (Australia)
Miwako Nishizawa (USA)
Sumi Perera (UK)
Joseph Ryan (Ireland)
Mustafa Sidki (UK)
Ella Weber (USA)

For more information 

Richard Parker and Mark Graver Exhibition

Richard Parker and Mark Graver

Art at Wharepuke’s end of year/ New Year exhibition brings together two Kerikeri based artists with international reputations.

Richard Parker, a renowned ceramic artist who’s work is held in many national and international public collections will present recent works never before exhibited in Northland.
Richard Parker pottery

Mark Graver‘s new print series include digital works based on the Kerikeri River and the forms and patterns of Wharepuke Subtropical Garden.  Graver’s work is held in public collections such as the V&A Museum, London, The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford and collections in Australia, China, Thailand, Mexico and NZ.

mark graver

Tony Holmquist


Tony Holmquist – Recurring Systems

May 21st – June 12th
Opening Reception Wed May 20th  4.30 – 6.30 pm
All welcome – meet the artist
tony holmquist

Tony Holmquist was first prize winner of Art at Wharepuke’s 3rd international open submission printmaking competition and is coming to Wharepuke as a resident artist and install his new show Recurring Systems.  He will be present at an opening reception on Wed May 20th from 4.30 – 6.30 pm.

Details for the 4th Open Submission printmaking show can be found here

tony holmquist

Tony is an assistant professor in the Department of Art & Design at Fort Lewis College Durango, Colorado, USA and has worked in printmaking for his entire career.

He exhibits his work around the world at galleries and shows such as the International Print Center of New York, the National Arts Club, the Art at Wharepuke International Print Show and the International Miniprint Finland Triennial.

Tony is also a musician who researches, interprets, and disseminates old-time music through the fiddle, banjo and guitar. He won first place in the banjo competitions at the 2014 Central Rockies Old-Time Music Festival and the 2013 Santa Fe Bluegrass and Old-Time festival.

Tony has received several awards for his work, including the Honourable Prize of Miniprint Finland (2014), the Juror’s Award (first place) at the Wharepuke International Printmaking Show in New Zealand and the Juror’s Award (second place) at the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art.


John Robinson – Printmaking Residency

John Robinson – Printmaking Residency

John Robinson came to Wharepuke here in Kerikeri in the Bay of Islands in December to do a nontoxic printmaking residency with Mark Graver in December 2014.

  • Artist Residency in Non toxic Printmaking John Robinson

John has worked for 9 years as the Technical Officer in Printmaking at the University of Tasmania, Tasmanian College of the Arts, Hobart. He has taught with TAFE, Adult Ed, and community based printmaking groups, has over 20 years’ experience in commercial printing and recently established Moving Creature studio, an open access printmaking studio in Lindisfarne, a suburb on the Eastern shore of Hobart.

John has been gradually instigating changes within the University Printmaking studio towards non-toxic processes and gained a scholarship to study at Wharepuke with Mark to hone some of the acrylic based methods available.

John and his wife Pauline managed a weekend away camping after the course and explored the Cape Reinga region (the top of NZ), beaches and our native forests.

Since returning to Hobart John has been further experimenting and preparing for a new academic year where the students will be further introduced to nontoxic printmaking.

Mark and John are now discussing future projects and further possible links that can be made between Wharepuke, the University of Tasmania and Moving Creature studio.


Irena Keckes – Woodcuts

Irena Keckes – Woodcuts

Art at Wharepuke

190 Kerikeri road

15th Dec – 4th Jan
open 7 days 9.00am – 5.00pm

Irena Keckes

Irena Keckes is an artist and arts educator, currently based in Auckland, New Zealand. She was born in Croatia, where she gained BA in Art Education and Printmaking at the Academy of Fine Arts, University of Zagreb (2000). Irena earned Masters of Fine Arts in Printmaking from Tokyo University of the Arts (2005). Currently, she is completing PhD with Creative Practice at Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland (2011- present).

As part of her doctoral research project integrating theory and practice, Irena Keckes has created large-scale woodcut prints, and researched the links among ecologically informed Buddhism, and non-toxic and expanded forms of print.

Her artwork has been exhibited internationally at eighteen independent, and numerous group exhibitions; these included the Tallinn Triennial of Drawing (2012), Kyoto Art Festival (2012, 2014) and International Mokuhanga Exhibition at Tokyo University of the Arts (2014).

She has been an artist in residence in Japan (2000) and Korea (2005), and an active member of several art associations including Croatian Association of Artists (since 2001) and Print Council of Aotearoa New Zealand (since 2014).

Irena Keckes presented an academic poster and portfolio at the Impact 8 International Printmaking Conference in Dundee (2013) and an academic paper at the 2nd International Mokuhanga Conference in Tokyo (2014).

As a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland, Irena Keckes has been teaching Printmaking and Drawing academic projects to undergraduate students, since 2011.

Art at Wharepuke - Irena Keckes



My art has been informed by a strong desire to work in the media of print in particular within the field of contemporary, ecologically responsive printmaking. Over the past twelve years I have lived and worked in diverse scholastic, artistic and intellectual environments. Moving through the myriad of cultural worlds made an impact on my practice.
My recent research has been exploring if and how some of central Buddhist notions, such as interconnectedness or causality, may inform ecologically mindful printmaking. The interest in this topic and approach to print practice grew from my previous training in traditional Japanese water-based woodcut that originally involves non-toxic methodologies. Taking mokuhanga (Japanese woodcut) as a starting point, merging apparently disparate theories, philosophies, methodologies and processes, one of the main sequels of my work has been to represent one example of expanded printmaking.

In some instances I have extended my practice by detaching print off the walls and moving into the space, and in others I exhibited carved plates and wooden shavings as sculptural objects alongside the prints. I have shifted the main focus away from controlling the final outlook of the print to the processes of making itself. Expanding the scale of my plates also created a platform for a more intense exploration of the phenomenological aspects of my work, reconciling intellectual and physical actions of printmaking processes. Through an idea that making is thinking, and thinking is making, my work also has been investigating art/craft as an indivisible concept, as evident in three of my independent presentations in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

Woodcut print installation the Unlimited Resonance of Repetition (2012), consisted of ten three meters long woodcut prints suspended from the ceiling. These large prints were created in Japanese water-based woodblock printmaking method, and explored the notion of repetition embodied in the process or carving as well as in printing. Some of the wooden matrices were installed on the floor of the gallery in juxtaposition with prints. The Presence of Absence installation (2013) consisted of carved wooden plates and wooden shaves arranged on the walls and floors of the gallery. By creating a “carpet” of wooden chips the works in this show unveiled the idea of impermanence: the wooden shaves were once the plates. In my doctoral exhibition, Mindful Repetitions (2014), I presented 14.5 meters long print that surrounded the space of the gallery. As part of this installation, the 240x480cm large print was installed on the floor of the gallery.

Irenas Website